Medicare Supplements

United American has been a prominent Medicare Supplement insurance provider since Medicare began in 1966. Additionally, we’ve been a long-standing participant in the task forces working on Medicare Supplement insurance policy recommendations for the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.

Insurance Products

When you become a United American policyholder, you gain freedom of choice. Our products allow you to keep your choice of trusted doctors and hospitals. 

Group Insurance

United American Insurance Company has been a market leader in providing insurance to employer and union group sponsors for 25 years.

Careers

United American has been underwriting life and health insurance since 1947. Thousands of independent agents/agencies have found success selling our life, health, and Medicare Supplement policies.

Resources

One of the many things United American is well-known for is our superior customer service. When it comes to your health, we believe education, service, and support are vital. With our experience and stability, we’re the Company that does what it says it will do.

File A Claim

Because of our 50+ years of experience in providing life, supplemental health and Medicare Supplement insurance, United American offers superior customer service to both our agents and customers.  Never stress about your claim status with our online claim tracker. Need more help? Let one of our licensed agents assist you.

Contact

At United American, we only provide knowledgeable and licensed agents to service you. Say goodbye to wasted hours spent on hold and bid good riddance to talking to artificial intelligence. Hear a live voice or get one-on-one time with one of our licensed agents today.

Call Today:  844-593-8913

When Should I Enroll in Medicare if I am Turning 65 This Year?

When Should I Enroll in Medicare if I am Turning 65 This Year?
Congratulations on turning 65! While most of the public will rely on private or public health insurance, you’re now eligible to enroll in Medicare coverage, health for insurance Seniors.*

Enroll in Medicare as soon as you can.

The Initial Enrollment Period for Medicare lasts for seven months, starting three months before you turn 65, and ending three months after the month you turn 65.
 
If you enroll in Medicare during this time, you can expect coverage shortly after (which we’ll discuss later) and avoid paying any late enrollment penalties.

Avoid late enrollment penalties.

If you don’t enroll in Medicare during your Initial 7-Month Enrollment Period, it’s possible you have to wait to sign up and pay a monthly late enrollment penalty.
 
When it comes to Medicare, there is Part A (hospital expenses) and Part B (outpatient medical expenses). While some Seniors are eligible to enroll in Part A for free while Medicare Part B requires a monthly premium. If you miss your Initial 7-Month Enrollment Period, you may have to pay a monthly penalty for as long as you have Part B coverage and a late fee on Part A for those who pay a Part A premium. To avoid any penalty payments, enroll during your Initial 7-Month Enrollment Period.

Medicare coverage starts depending on when you sign up.

Seniors who are eligible for premium-free Part A would have coverage starting the month they turn 65. If your birthday is on the first of the month, coverage starts the month before you turn 65.
 
For Part B (and Premium-Part A), coverage starts based on the month you sign up.
 
If you sign up for Medicare:
  • Before the month you turn 65, coverage starts the month you turn 65
  • The month you turn 65, coverage starts the next month
  • One month after you turn 65, coverage starts two months after you sign up
  • Two to three months after you turn 65, coverage starts three months after you sign up

General Enrollment Period is for Seniors who did not enroll during their Initial Enrollment Period.

Between January 1 and March 31 of each year, Seniors can sign up for Medicare during the General Enrollment Period. Coverage for those signing up during this period starts July 1.
 
Those who don’t qualify for a Special Enrollment Period, you may have to pay a monthly late enrollment penalty.

There are Special Enrollment Periods for Seniors under special circumstances.

You can sign up for Part B (and Premium-Part A) during a Special Enrollment Period without paying a late enrollment penalty. If you miss sign up during this period, you have to wait for the next General Enrollment Period and you might have to pay a monthly late enrollment penalty.
 
Special situations include:
  • If you have health insurance through your employer and are still working, you can sign up for Part A and Part B any time as long as:
    • You have group health plan coverage
    • You or your spouse is working for the employer that provides your health coverage
  • You or your spouse stop working or you lose group health plan coverage (whichever happens first). Your 8-month Special Enrollment Period starts when you stop working, even if you choose COBRA or other coverage that’s not Medicare.
  • You may also qualify for special enrollment if you’re a volunteer, serving in a foreign country.

Once you’re a Medicare beneficiary, you’re eligible to enroll in additional coverage.

Now that you’ve enrolled in Medicare, you can also enroll in additional plans that help pay for out of pocket expenses left behind by Medicare. 

Get one-on-one support from an agent.

Licensed insurance agents can help narrow down your Medicare coverage options based on your state, age, health, lifestyle, and needs. While your coverage and needs may change year to year, an agent can help you through any enrollment period so your needs are met. Call one of our licensed agents today for more information on Medicare.

Save yourself the headache and enroll in Medicare as soon as you can.

To avoid any late penalties or further delay in coverage, it’s best to sign up for Medicare during your Initial 7-month Enrollment Period starting three months before you turn 65, and ending three months after the month you turn 65.
 
*People 65 or older, under 65 with certain disabilities, and people of any age with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant) are eligible to enroll in Medicare. Medicare enrollment periods vary for those with disabilities or ESRD, see Medicare.gov for details.

References: Medicare.gov

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